Moving During Retirement

Some people stay in place when they retire, while others buy a second home or relocate entirely. If you’re thinking of buying a new home, should you plan the purchase before you stop working, or is it possible to get to a mortgage after you’re retired?   Plenty of retirees can qualify for a mortgage…

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21st Century Tree -Hugging Strategies

The phrase “tree hugger” refers to an environmentalist who advocates for the preservation of woodlands. Its original historical reference is to an incident that occurred in India in 1730, when local villagers literally hugged trees in an effort to prevent foresters from chopping them down for materials to build a palace. In doing so, more…

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The COVID Vaccine, 50 Years in the Making

Back in the 1970s, a Hungarian scientist named Katalin Kariko began working on mRNA therapeutics, but her research was believed to be too radical and a financial risk. Years later, she moved to the U.S. and found better support. It was then that Kariko developed a vaccine approach using synthetic mRNA, which became the basis…

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Annuity Insights

The Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) – a trade association for the retirement income industry – advocates annuities as a vehicle that can help provide retirees income, guaranteed by the insurer. The organization has been actively educating and lobbying legislators to expand annuity access as part of employer-sponsored retirement plans.1 Under this scenario, whatever portion the…

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Open Enrollment: Health Care Insurance Takes Priority

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) – passed in 2010 and known colloquially as “Obamacare” – has experienced quite a ride. Initially, it was embraced by millions of Americans for whom it afforded tax-subsidized health insurance without access to employer-sponsored coverage. At the same time, it was derided for increasing government sharing costs…

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The Millennial Economy

The millennial generation hasn’t had it so great. A recent economic analysis reports that since entering the workforce five to 20 years ago, the average millennial has experienced slower economic advancement than any other generation in U.S. history.1 It’s not just a matter of long periods of high unemployment. It’s also because getting that first…

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Americans and Their 401(k)s

A recent survey found that working households experiencing financial strain due to the pandemic have not been inclined to make withdrawals from their 401(k)s to help make ends meet. In fact, the vast majority haven’t even changed their rate of contributions. Instead, these households are relying on the “old standbys” of surviving during economic decline:…

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Dealing with Anxiety? Learn Ways to Cope

Anxiety is the most common mental complaint in the U.S., with more than 40 million people suffering from it on a regular basis, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.1 Factors such as genetics, personality or life events can contribute to anxiety, but it’s important to recognize that anyone can experience serious and…

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The Work/Life Balancing Act

Researchers have estimated how much of our lifetime is spent on various activities. For example, based on a lifespan of 80 years, the average person will spend:1   26 years sleeping 7 years trying to get to sleep 13 years at work 8 years watching TV 5 years eating 3 years on social media 3…

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The Art of Being Happy

When are we happiest? A new study by the Resolution Foundation reveals that the two ages when people tend to be their happiest are 16 and 70.1 This makes sense when you think about it. Sixteen is often the first time children get a taste of independence — they’re old enough to drive and yet…

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