4 Myths of Long-Term Care

Today, Americans live longer, which means we must address long-term care costs when considering retirement planning.  In 1950, the life expectancy for men was 67 years, and 72 years for women.1 Today, according to the Social Security Administration, a 65-year-old person can expect to live an additional 19 to 21 years on average. What’s more, the…

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Who Wants A Job?

An important economic driver for America — working consumers — is dwindling. For example, the Denver International Airport recently hosted a concessions job fair to fill around 1,000 openings at the airport for jobs at stores, restaurants, and other businesses. Only 100 people attended the fair.1   Money could be one issue. In Georgia, Kentucky,…

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Pets and Pet Insurance

One of the silver linings coming from the pandemic is that when pet shelters had to close temporarily during lockdowns, a call went out for foster homes so animals would continue receiving the necessary attention. Many of those pets were so loved that they were adopted rather than returned to shelters.   In other cases,…

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How Inflation Risk Can Affect You

Inflation is a steady rise in the price of goods and services over time and actually signals both good and bad economic conditions.

Inflation is a steady rise in the price of goods and services over time and actually signals both good and bad economic conditions. On one hand, as prices rise, someone living on a fixed income cannot purchase the same amount of goods, so they tend to reduce spending or buy cheaper alternatives. On the other…

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Moving During Retirement

Some people stay in place when they retire, while others buy a second home or relocate entirely. If you’re thinking of buying a new home, should you plan the purchase before you stop working, or is it possible to get to a mortgage after you’re retired?   Plenty of retirees can qualify for a mortgage…

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Putting Inflation Expectations in Perspective

Historically, inflation has been highly correlated with unemployment levels. When more people were out of a job, inflation was lower. As more people got jobs, inflation increased. From an economic point of view, this makes sense. Jobs increase income, which increases spending, which increases demand — supplies drop and prices rise. The opposite is true…

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21st Century Tree -Hugging Strategies

The phrase “tree hugger” refers to an environmentalist who advocates for the preservation of woodlands. Its original historical reference is to an incident that occurred in India in 1730, when local villagers literally hugged trees in an effort to prevent foresters from chopping them down for materials to build a palace. In doing so, more…

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What’s Driving Oil Prices?

Oil prices are influenced by supply and demand, and 2020 was a great demonstration of this principle. With global and local shutdowns due to the spread of the coronavirus, there was less demand for products and services. While online shopping was up, foot traffic in stores languished and retailers – both local and nationwide –…

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The COVID Vaccine, 50 Years in the Making

Back in the 1970s, a Hungarian scientist named Katalin Kariko began working on mRNA therapeutics, but her research was believed to be too radical and a financial risk. Years later, she moved to the U.S. and found better support. It was then that Kariko developed a vaccine approach using synthetic mRNA, which became the basis…

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Wealth and Income

Spectrem Group’s recent Market Insights Report found that millionaire investors in the U.S. achieved a new record last year. The number of households with a net worth ranging between $1 million and $5 million (excluding primary residence) increased by 600,000, reaching 11.6 million in 2020.   Furthermore:1 The number of households with a net worth…

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