Low Supply Increases Demand

The labor shortage is fueling demand for higher wages and supply chain disruptions are causing higher prices

Across the board, we’re seeing the capitalist principles of supply and demand both drive and curb U.S. economic activity. As more people have emerged from their hermit-like existence throughout the past year and a half, consumer spending is shifting from goods to services. For example, the services industry (e.g., restaurants, travel, hospitality) is on the…

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Who Wants A Job?

An important economic driver for America — working consumers — is dwindling. For example, the Denver International Airport recently hosted a concessions job fair to fill around 1,000 openings at the airport for jobs at stores, restaurants, and other businesses. Only 100 people attended the fair.1   Money could be one issue. In Georgia, Kentucky,…

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Pets and Pet Insurance

One of the silver linings coming from the pandemic is that when pet shelters had to close temporarily during lockdowns, a call went out for foster homes so animals would continue receiving the necessary attention. Many of those pets were so loved that they were adopted rather than returned to shelters.   In other cases,…

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Savings Strategies

Some people have no trouble with their savings and as a result, their account grows. That’s a wonderful trait, in some ways.

Some people have no trouble saving money — they stash away any cash they don’t need, and their account grows and grows. These people usually aren’t very materialistic and don’t have a lot of goals that require money to fulfill. That’s a wonderful trait, in some ways.   However, there’s nothing wrong with setting up…

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Roth vs. Traditional IRA

It would be nice if the Roth IRA had been around long as the traditional IRA. Imagine the long-term benefits of tax-free growth throughout a 40-year career. Annual contribution limits for IRAs are relatively low ($6,000; $7,000 for 50-plus), but the Roth is a good complement for investors who also contribute to an employer-based retirement…

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Putting Inflation Expectations in Perspective

Historically, inflation has been highly correlated with unemployment levels. When more people were out of a job, inflation was lower. As more people got jobs, inflation increased. From an economic point of view, this makes sense. Jobs increase income, which increases spending, which increases demand — supplies drop and prices rise. The opposite is true…

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Retirement Withdrawal Strategies

As hard as retirement saving and investing may seem, that’s the easy part. The real challenge is figuring out how to make your accumulated savings last throughout your and your spouse’s retirements. You need a strategy, and it’s best to have that strategy developed before retirement begins.   Because life expectancy is longer these days,…

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Tax Strategies

  In an effort to pay for new legislation, the Biden administration has proposed higher taxes for the nation’s highest earners. The president advocates returning the top tax rate to 39.6% for individuals earning $452,700 or more, and married couples with more than $509,300 in combined taxable income.1   This top tax rate was just…

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What’s Driving Oil Prices?

Oil prices are influenced by supply and demand, and 2020 was a great demonstration of this principle. With global and local shutdowns due to the spread of the coronavirus, there was less demand for products and services. While online shopping was up, foot traffic in stores languished and retailers – both local and nationwide –…

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Wealth and Income

Spectrem Group’s recent Market Insights Report found that millionaire investors in the U.S. achieved a new record last year. The number of households with a net worth ranging between $1 million and $5 million (excluding primary residence) increased by 600,000, reaching 11.6 million in 2020.   Furthermore:1 The number of households with a net worth…

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